Actor Tools | 5 ways to memorising Monologues

Monologues

Monologues are a great tool for actors to build confidence, character exploration, and a way to  develop your technique. Yet for most actors memorising monologues is still a daunting process.

Here are fews ways to help you memorising monologues.

  1. Read it aloud.First read the monologue out loud, a couple of  times. Read to understand the monologues not to know the lines. It’s easier to memorise things with emotion and context. To find them, read the whole monologue (and, if possible, understand the story and character behind it). Imagine you were directing a performance – look for rhythm, tone, intention and transitions. Also, look up any words you don’t know
  2. Break it up.–Start by breaking the monologue down into chunks, either using natural breaking points like paragraphs or simply dividing it into even sections.
  3. Use the visualization strategy to memorize your monologue.– While you are reviewing your monologue, make mental images in your mind for each section you created. If at any point you forget a line from the script, think back to the mental images you created. 
  4. Write out the entire monologue. Writing things down can increase your retention because you use different parts of your brain than when you’re speaking. Writing also activates muscle memory and allows you to slowly absorb every word and sentence. So write down your entire monologue a couple of times until it stays in your memory.
  5. Get-Physical.–Do a physical activity like washing the dishes or cleaning your bedroom. While you are in physical motion go over your lines. Keep the text nearby so whenever you drop a line you can quickly refer to the monologue.  It’s a good idea to avoid straining to remember your words. Acting is about behavior.  The more lucid and less constricted you are physically, the more fully you will be able to express yourself.
  6. BONUS TIPs –Less tension will increase sharper concentration, sharper concentration will increase relaxation.

Actor tool | Choosing the right monologue 

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